Eggbeater Chuck Rebuild

I recently acquired a nice Miller’s Falls #2A 1940’s vintage eggbeater drill. My intent is a complete restoration, but the chuck didn’t work properly so I disassembled it. There were no springs in the chuck. Finding springs for a vintage chuck is not an easy task even for a tool dealer with 20+ years in the business. However, I did find someone who loaned me an original spring to copy.

This is a complete set of shop made springs for the Ryther patent drill chuck.

Yesterday I managed to bend a set of three, actually I made four but the black hole beneath my bench ate one. They are shown in the picture above. The springs were bent from 1/32″ diameter music wire bought at the local hobby shop. For a few dollars I got enough wire to make a hundred springs.

Here you see the springs holding the jaws on the pusher.

The only tweeking I had to do was shortening the length of the leg that goes into the jaws. They stuck out beyond the jaws.

The chuck assembled with the shop made springs. The jaws are located as well as those I have seen on original chucks.

Jaw alignment is well within acceptable limits. The chuck works pretty smoothly, but a little polishing will make it even better. Now the restoration can begin………… when I find some time.

I will publish the restoration here for you all to see. It will be lengthy because I want to make new wood knobs and a new handle also. Cocobolo will be the wood of choice.

As always thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

 

 

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About R & B ENTERPRISES

Professional furniture maker and restorer. Dealer and collector of vintage and antique woodworking tools.
This entry was posted in Woodworking Hand Tools and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Eggbeater Chuck Rebuild

  1. Marilyn says:

    Wow! I have one to those too! .. the black hole beneath my bench that is. Even my large magnet hasn’t been able to retrieve some items that have been pulled in. And its exceptionally frustrating thing when I’m working with some small part and it goes flying. 😉

    Looking forward to the restore. I might like to try a similar endeavor except for the knobs. I’m betting you have a lathe if you’re remaking knobs .. and I have none.

  2. Bob jones says:

    Let me know if you are interested in making more of those knobs for sale. I may like some in walnut to match the plane handles you made me.

    • I make knobs and totes!
      Please fill out the order form on my website. This gives me a hard copy to take into the shop and hopefully prwvents your oreder from getting lost in the emails.
      Right now orders are pretty backed up so you may not make the “list” until next year.

  3. Jeff Rogers says:

    I just purchased a eggbeater drill Miller Falls No. 2 online and when it arrived, we found the springs to be missing. Someone had installed a single compression spring which keeps the jaws closed and it is difficult to install the bits. Would you be willing to share the dimensions of the spring?

    Thanks,

    Jeff

  4. Todd Haugen says:

    I am working on the same problem. Did you have to do any heat treating & temporing to give the wire some spring ? When the chuck closed and opened, do the three jaws still expand ?

    • If you use music wire, sometimes called piano wire, it is already heat treated. This makes it more difficult to cut and bend, but eliminates the need for spring tempering when done. Music wire is available at hobby stores locally or from hobby suppliers online. If you have any more questions or problems please contact me here: www HARDWARECITYTOOLS@gmail.com

      Thanks for your comments.

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