Improving the Veritas Tote

From left to right, Stanley, mine, original Veritas totes.

From left to right, Stanley, mine, original Veritas totes.

A lot of thought, time, and independent testing went into the design of my replacement tote for the Veritas handplanes. The photo above shows a comparison of the veritable Stanley tote to my Veritas replacement tote, and the original Veritas tote as seen on my bevel up jack plane. As you can see the Veritas tote is taller. That is because there is no frog on which to point your index finger. Therefore, the tote must accommodate 4 fingers instead of the usual 3 fingers. If you have a Veritas plane and are unhappy with the original tote visit my website for more information on my replacement knob and tote sets for the Veritas, and other, planes. As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Restoring a Pair of Chisels

The victims...errrr subjects! A Witherby and a Buck.

The victims…errrr subjects! A Witherby and a Buck.

 

Recently I restored a pair of chisels for a friend, Matt Cianci, in payment for sharpening a pair of saws for me. The pic above shows the chisels as I received them. Matt had de-rusted them prior to sending them to me. They had no handles and were far from useable. He included a hornbeam log to be used for the handles.

The hornbeam log cut into 2 pieces for the chisel handles.

The hornbeam log cut into 2 pieces for the chisel handles.

The hornbeam log cut and ready for the lathe.

One chisel handle blank turned round and marked out for roughing out.

One chisel handle blank turned round and marked out for roughing out.

You will see the finished handles later.

Now I move on to polishing the chisels using Scotch Brite wheels on my buffer, but you could mount these on any old electric motor. I recommend one that turns 3650 RPM. I use a rough and a finish wheel. I use a 1″ wide belt sander to rough polish the sockets before I go to the Scotch Brite wheels.

The chisels after polishing.

The chisels after polishing.

The above pic really does not due justice to these old chisels. They look pretty good compared to when I first received them.

Flattening the chisel backs.

Flattening the chisel backs.

Next I ground the bevels to 23º on my bench grinder and flattened the backs on my diamond plates. I left the final honing of the backs and the secondary bevels to Matt.

The finished chisels with new hornbeam handles.

The finished chisels with new hornbeam handles.

Above you can see the finished chisels with their old style hornbeam handles ready for another 100 years of service.

Please note that I have added a restored Stanley #720 chisel with a new hornbeam handle to the “For Sale” page.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

 

 

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Another New Shop Addition

Media blast cabinet under assembly.

Media blast cabinet under assembly.

Recently I purchase a media blast cabinet for my shop. Above you can see it under construction. It is a sizeable cabinet and there are a lot of parts.

The completed blast cabinet ready to be hooked up to the compressor.

The completed blast cabinet ready to be hooked up to the compressor.

Above you can see the assembled media blast cabinet ready to go to work as soon as I get the plumbing for it done. It will need a filter/drier, a regulator and a shutoff.

When in operation this unit will allow me to strip the japan/paint from old tools very quickly and efficiently.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

 

 

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Saw Sharpening Bench Part 3

Stacked Dado setup on the table saw to cut tenons.

Stacked Dado setup on the table saw to cut tenons.

Finally I got a little open time in the woodshop so I decided to mill the tenons on the aprons and stretchers for the saw sharpening bench. The stacked dado set on the table saw was the tool of choice for the tenon cheek cuts. I have a good tenon jig, but I was not comfortable using this for the long aprons and stretcher. These cuts could also be done with a tenon saw.

The aprons and stretchers with the tenon cheek cuts complete.

The aprons and stretchers with the tenon cheek cuts complete.

In the pic above you see the aprons and stretchers with the cheek cuts done. The long aprons and stretcher have stub tenons because these will be held to the legs with 3/8″ lag bolts so the base can be disassembled for transporting.

Here the tenons are being cut to final length on the bandsaw.

Here the tenons are being cut to final width on the bandsaw.

The next operation is to cut the tenons to width. For this task I chose my bandsaw. I stayed away from the shoulder slightly so this can be trimmed with a chisel at the bench later ensuring good shoulder contact all around the joint.

All tenon machining is complete.

All tenon machining is complete.

In the pic above we see all the tenons have been finish machined. Next they must be hand fitted to their respective mortises. I rarely attempt to machine fit tenons preferring to use a shoulder plane and chisels to get a proper fit. That will have to wait for the next session. It is best to proceed to glueup when the joinery is complete whenever possible.

 

As always thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Plane Tip

image

Keep an old candle on your bench when planing. Rub it on the sole of the plane and you will find it much easier to push. It will not have any ill affects on your finish.

As always thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

Posted in Quick Tips | 1 Comment

Knob and Tote Price Increase

Replacement knob and tote

Replacement knob and tote

I have been making and selling high quality knobs and totes for handplanes for a good number of years. During all that time I have held my price. If you read my 3 part series on making a tote you know that it is a labor intensive handwork task. Lately I took a close look at the time required to produce a knob and tote set and my costs for a set. The conclusion I reached was that I was buried under 5+ week backlogs continuously working 7 days per week for much too little net gain. So it was with great reluctance that I increased my price for a cherry or walnut knob and tote set to $55. I hope you all understand that this was driven by need not greed.

As always thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Glue

Gluing abrasive paper to a shop jig.

Gluing abrasive paper to a shop jig.

In the pic above I’m gluing a piece of abrasive paper to an angled surface of a holding jig to prevent the workpiece from slipping down the angle when tightened in the jig. Yellow, or white glue, as well as most other glues commonly used in woodworking, won’t work well in this application. They allow too much creep. Simply put they dry to a semi-plastic state and allow the glued piece to slide down the angle when clamping pressure is applied. This defeats the purpose of the abrasive paper. So, what glue to use?

Liquid hide glue.

Liquid hide glue.

I have found liquid hide glue works very well in this application. It dries fast and hard and exhibits no creep. This is also my glue of choice for bent laminations.

I have also found it useful for many other applications around the shop. It is my glue of choice for most furniture projects.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

 

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