Customers Plane More Info

A bronze Lie-Nielsen #4-1/2 with a holly knob and tote.

A bronze Lie-Nielsen #4-1/2 with a holly knob and tote.

I have found out that this beautiful plane was indeed engraved by Catherine C. Kennedy. A true artisan.

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A Customer’s Plane

A bronze Lie-Nielsen #4-1/2 with a holly knob and tote.

A bronze Lie-Nielsen #4-1/2 with a holly knob and tote.

A customer sent me this photo of his Lie-Nielsen bronze #4-1/2 smoothing plane I made the holly knob and tote for him. I don’t know who did the engraving. This plane is absolutely gorgeous.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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New Handle for a Turning Tool

The original style handle above the new handle below.

The original style handle above the new handle below.

I just finished re-handling a 1/4″ spindle gouge. It is like new even though I have had it for years. I never used it because I didn’t like the handle. It had the same handle as the skew chisel above it in the photo above. It was too long and an awkward shape. So I found a chunk of hickory and fashioned a new handle in a shape and length that I find comfortable. I finished it in a mix of oil and bees wax with a coat of hard wax over that and a good buffing on a wheel.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Saw Sharpening Bench Part 5

Finishing the bench base.

Finishing the bench base.

With the milling and the joinery done I decided to  apply a finish to the parts before assembly. It is easier to do this now than after the base is assembled. I used a favorite home brew finish that I have been using for years. It is a mixture of bees wax, boiled linseed oil and mineral sprits. I slathered it on. Let is soak for a few minutes and wiped the excess off. Then buffed with a clean rag. WARNING!!! DISPOSE OF LINSEED OIL SOAKED RAGS AND PAPER TOWELS SAFELY. THEY CAN SELF COMBUST. HANG THEM OUTDOORS IN A SINGLE LAYER TO DRY. After drying over night the base was ready to assemble.

Assembling the bench base.

Assembling the bench base.

When the finish was dried on the base side assemblies I attached them to the long aprons and stretcher using 3/8″ hex head lag screws and washers through holes and counterbores that had been previously drilled, as can be seen in the pic above.

Here you can see the levelers that I used on the legs.

Here you can see the levelers that I used on the legs.

Level bench tops are something I insist upon.  I want to be able to set things down without having them roll off the top. To this end I installed a leveler in the bottom of each leg. As can be seen in the pic above. These consist of a rubber foot with a 3/8-16 threaded shank. This shank screws into a 3/8-16 t-nut that is installed in the bottom of each leg. There is a clearance hole for the shank of the foot and the foot is locked in position, after adjustment, with a locknut.

Drilling the blocks that will attach the top to the base.

Drilling the blocks that will attach the top to the base.

Hardwood blocks are used to attach the top to the base.

Hardwood blocks are used to attach the top to the base.

The benchtop is an old kitchen island top that I got for free out the dumpster at the woodshop. It was removed from a kitchen that was being remodeled. It is particle board covered with high pressure laminate. The price was right and it was a good size. I found the top and designed a base to fit it.

I used 6 hardwood blocks to attach the top to the base. Two in front and in back and one on each side. The pic above clearly shows how the blocks are attached. Two screws hold the blocks to the aprons and one screw into the top holds the top securely to the base.

The shelf attached to the bench.

The shelf attached to the bench.

Next the shelf supports were attached to the bench with 3 screws into the benchtop. Three screws hold the shelf securely in its dado. There is about 3″ of shelf support above the shelf to keep things from falling off of the shelf.

The shelf back being attached.

The shelf back being attached.

In the above pic you see the 1/4″ plywood shelf back attached with screws. This makes the shelf assembly very sturdy and, with the shelf supports, encloses the shelf on 3 sides preventing things from falling off.

Assembly of the bench completed.

Assembly of the bench completed.

Vise Mounting blocks installed.

Vise Mounting blocks installed.

Now it is time to make and install the saw vise mounting blocks. These blocks were designed to allow the vise jaws to just clear the edge of the top and rise above the top just enough to allow clearance for tooth filing.

The vise mounted to the blocks.

The vise mounted to the blocks.

The pic above shows the new saw vise securely attached to the bench. Time to bring it to its home and set the bench up for work.

Bench assembly and setup complete.

Bench assembly and setup complete.

With the saw bench assembly completed it was leveled and a task light installed. This bench was designed to place the saw tooth line at a comfortable height for me, seated in this chair. It is truly a purpose built bench.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

 

 

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Chisel Restoration

Set of fine chisels ready for sharpening.

Set of fine chisels ready for sharpening.

Just finished this rare set of Anton Berg socket chisels. The original handles were removed and the steel de-rusted in my electrolysis tank. Then they were put through a process I call “brightening”. This is a light polish where no measureable amount of metal is removed. Then I made new handles, replicating the originals, from hickory. These chisel are ready for another generation of service.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Hacksaw Restoratin

The MF saw as foung.

The MF saw as found.

I like straight handled hacksaws better than the modern pistol grips so whenever I find one it seems to follow me home. The Millers Falls #26 seen above came in a boxlot of tools that I bought at a local auction.

The first order of business was disassembling the saw.

The first order of business was disassembling the saw.

I disassembled the saw and examined all the parts. After determining that all the parts were in good condition except for some rust it was time for de-rusting. The small parts went into EvapoRust and the bigger parts went into the electrolysis tank.

After the de-rusting process all the metal parts were cleaned up on a non-woven abrasive wheel. Most of the nickel plating on the frame was long gone. Having it re-plated was not an option because of the expense.  If I had a dozen frames then nickel plating would have been cost effective. A high quality metallic silver paint was used instead.

Turning a new handle on the lathe.

Turning a new handle on the lathe.

The original handle was poorly designed, too small, and pretty cheap looking. So I turned a new handle from hickory. The pic above shows the new handle in the lathe ready for sanding.

The MF hacksaw finished and ready for work.

The MF hacksaw finished and ready for work.

The steel stud was pressed into the new handle and the hacksaw was assembled. As can be seen in the pic above the tool is now ready for another generation of use.

I can’t keep all the tools that I restore, though I would like to, so this hacksaw is for sale if anyone is interested.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Saw Sharpening Bench Part 4

Fitting tenons.

Fitting tenons.

Sizing tenons with a shoulder plane.

Sizing tenons with a shoulder plane.

The last time I worked on this bench was in March. Finally I am getting a chance to finish this project. The mortises were cut and the sides pared using chisels and the tenons cut on the table saw using a stacked dado cutter previously.

Now it is time to fit the tenons to their individual mortises. Joints should be fitted just before glue up. Avoid letting fitted joints sit around the shop for any length of time if at all possible. For this operation I used a Stanley #93 shoulder plane and a couple of chisels. I know many woodworkers machine these joints to size, but a better finish and fit can be achieved by leaving the tenons a little heavy and sizing them with a sharp plane. Also, the hollow chisel mortiser does a very good job, but a better finish can be had by paring the sides of the finished mortise with a wide chisel. A better finish and a better fit means a better glue joint. This is where sharp hand tools stand out.

One of the side frames in clamps.

One of the side frames in clamps.

Once the tenons have ben fitted to their respective mortises the side frames can be glued up. I use liquid hide glue for all my projects and furniture. With this glue a glue up is a pleasure, as it should be, instead of a fire drill. The modern glues just don’t give enough working time. Also, joints glued with modern glues are not reversible. If you have ever disassembled a piece of furniture for repair or restoration you know how important it can be to be able to take a joint apart with relative ease.

The long aprons and stretcher are located with stub tenons and held to the side frames with 3/8″ hex head lag bolts. You will see this in the next post.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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