Hacksaw Restoratin

The MF saw as foung.

The MF saw as found.

I like straight handled hacksaws better than the modern pistol grips so whenever I find one it seems to follow me home. The Millers Falls #26 seen above came in a boxlot of tools that I bought at a local auction.

The first order of business was disassembling the saw.

The first order of business was disassembling the saw.

I disassembled the saw and examined all the parts. After determining that all the parts were in good condition except for some rust it was time for de-rusting. The small parts went into EvapoRust and the bigger parts went into the electrolysis tank.

After the de-rusting process all the metal parts were cleaned up on a non-woven abrasive wheel. Most of the nickel plating on the frame was long gone. Having it re-plated was not an option because of the expense.  If I had a dozen frames then nickel plating would have been cost effective. A high quality metallic silver paint was used instead.

Turning a new handle on the lathe.

Turning a new handle on the lathe.

The original handle was poorly designed, too small, and pretty cheap looking. So I turned a new handle from hickory. The pic above shows the new handle in the lathe ready for sanding.

The MF hacksaw finished and ready for work.

The MF hacksaw finished and ready for work.

The steel stud was pressed into the new handle and the hacksaw was assembled. As can be seen in the pic above the tool is now ready for another generation of use.

I can’t keep all the tools that I restore, though I would like to, so this hacksaw is for sale if anyone is interested.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Saw Sharpening Bench Part 4

Fitting tenons.

Fitting tenons.

Sizing tenons with a shoulder plane.

Sizing tenons with a shoulder plane.

The last time I worked on this bench was in March. Finally I am getting a chance to finish this project. The mortises were cut and the sides pared using chisels and the tenons cut on the table saw using a stacked dado cutter previously.

Now it is time to fit the tenons to their individual mortises. Joints should be fitted just before glue up. Avoid letting fitted joints sit around the shop for any length of time if at all possible. For this operation I used a Stanley #93 shoulder plane and a couple of chisels. I know many woodworkers machine these joints to size, but a better finish and fit can be achieved by leaving the tenons a little heavy and sizing them with a sharp plane. Also, the hollow chisel mortiser does a very good job, but a better finish can be had by paring the sides of the finished mortise with a wide chisel. A better finish and a better fit means a better glue joint. This is where sharp hand tools stand out.

One of the side frames in clamps.

One of the side frames in clamps.

Once the tenons have ben fitted to their respective mortises the side frames can be glued up. I use liquid hide glue for all my projects and furniture. With this glue a glue up is a pleasure, as it should be, instead of a fire drill. The modern glues just don’t give enough working time. Also, joints glued with modern glues are not reversible. If you have ever disassembled a piece of furniture for repair or restoration you know how important it can be to be able to take a joint apart with relative ease.

The long aprons and stretcher are located with stub tenons and held to the side frames with 3/8″ hex head lag bolts. You will see this in the next post.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Latest Knob & Tote Set

Knob and tote made out of holly.

Knob and tote made out of holly.

Just finished this knob and tote made from holly. It was for the highly skilled engraver, Catherin C. Kennedy to mount on this beautifully engraved Stanley #4. The plane is finished in black oxide after it was ground true and engraved. I am honored to have had a part in the creation of this beautiful tool.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Hardware Quick Tip

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If you are like me and think that zinc plating on hardware looks cheap try this. A soak in a strong citric acid solution will remove all that cheap looking plating. Making your projects look better.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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Veritas Bevel Up Small Smoother

This insert is pressed and epoxied into the bottom of the tote.

This insert is pressed and epoxied into the bottom of the tote.

A follower asked how the tote was mounted on the Veritas bevel up small smooth plane. The metal casting shown above is fitted tightly into a mortise machined into the tote. It is then pressed and epoxied into the tote from the bottom.

The bottom of the OEM Veritas BU small smoother.

The bottom of the OEM Veritas BU small smoother.

The oblong boss of the cast metal part fits into a machined pocket in the plane and a bolt is run up from the bottom of the plane into the threaded hole in the metal casting.

To make a replacement tote for this Veritas plane I had to get this cast metal part from Lee Valley. I used this same threaded hole to attach the new tote blank to the new jig for shaping and sanding. Hope this answers any questions.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

 

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New Tote Jig

The parts of the holding jig.

The parts of the holding jig.

The jig holding the tote for finish sanding.

The jig holding the tote for finish sanding.

I have been working on a knob and tote set for the Veritas bevel up small smoother. The knob is pretty straight forward and posed no problems. The tote for that plane is another matter. I have always held totes to jigs using a threaded stud through the mounting hole just as they mount to the plane. The tote for the Veritas bevel up small smoother does not mount with a through hole so I had to come up with another style of jig.

I have been rolling ideas around in my mind for improving the method of holding totes for shaping and sanding for some time now. So I applied those ideas to this new jig. As you can see in the pics it is very simple and very flexible. This jig worked so well I will apply it to all the other tote holding jigs I have in the shop as soon as time permits.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

 

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New Tool

Woodriver sander at work shaping a cherry tote.

Woodriver sander at work shaping a cherry tote.

I recently purchased the Woodriver oscillating spindle sander. Here it is in use for the first time. It is much faster than the sanding drum in the drillpress method I have been using. The dust collection works very well and it is quiet. The finish is much better than I get from the stationary drum.  There seems to be plenty of power to handle most contouring jobs around the shop. It is currently on sale at a very good price.

If you have a need for a drum sander I can recommend this one highly. And at the current sale price it is a very good value.

As always, thanks for stopping by and feel free to leave a comment.

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